October 3, 2022

Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension: Symptoms, Treatment, More – Healthline

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder associated with increased fluid pressure around your brain. This can cause symptoms such as headaches or vision problems.

The word “idiopathic” means that there’s no known cause. It’s also been called benign intracranial hypertension or pseudotumor cerebri, but some experts view these terms as outdated.

Even though anyone can experience IIH, it’s most commonly diagnosed in women between the ages of 20 to 44 with ob…….

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Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder associated with increased fluid pressure around your brain. This can cause symptoms such as headaches or vision problems.

The word “idiopathic” means that there’s no known cause. It’s also been called benign intracranial hypertension or pseudotumor cerebri, but some experts view these terms as outdated.

Even though anyone can experience IIH, it’s most commonly diagnosed in women between the ages of 20 to 44 with obesity.

Many treatments for IIH are available. If you delay treatment, you could risk complications, including permanent vision loss.

Read on to learn more about IIH and what you need to know if you think you already have it.

There are several symptoms you might experience if you have IIH. Some of the classic symptoms of IIH include:

  • Headaches: These are often painful and recurring and might lead to additional symptoms such as nausea or light sensitivity. People with IIH experience headaches in 98% of cases.
  • Temporary loss of vision: This includes partial or complete loss of vision in one or both eyes. Vision usually returns after a few seconds. Up to 70% of people with IIH have temporary loss of vision.
  • Hearing your pulse: Also called pulsatile tinnitus, you may experience this in one or both ears. Up to 60% of people with IIH report having this symptom.
  • Eye floaters or flashes: Also called photopsia, this symptom occurs in 54% of IIH cases.
  • Persistent vision loss: Up to 32% of people with IIH report vision loss that lasts for an extended period. Most of these instances are linked to a delay in treatment.

The symptoms of IIH overlap with the symptoms of many other conditions, including brain tumors. Many of the diagnostic tools doctors use for IIH help to rule out other disorders.

If a healthcare professional believes you might have IIH, some possible diagnostic tests include:

If, after testing, your doctor can’t diagnose you with anything else and your symptoms still fit the criteria, they may diagnose you with IIH.

There are many options for treating IIH. Not all of them will work for everyone, so you’ll want to consult with a doctor to determine the best treatment plan for you.

Medical treatments for IIH include: